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McCracken’s story does not disappoint with her witty humor and tinge of sadness. I found it amazing that McCracken can take characters like the mother and Plazo and make them perfectly normal and slightly out of balance with the world. It is amazing because it feels or sounds real to the reader. One can truly imagine this family handling life like any other typical family, except some of the family members have a disability.

McCracken adds one more element that I have not noticed in her other stories. The mother towards the end uses violence towards her child. It was actually very shocking to read. It is over quickly, but the moment lasts longer in the mind of the reader. What is shocking is how the reader sees how she uses her feet/legs to knock down and keep Steven—her son–pinned to the floor. Then McCracken counterbalances this extreme moment with the calm and nurturing mother that you mostly witness throughout the story as she hugs her son. I believe a story written in a first person narrative makes it much harder to express the inner workings of another character’s mind. By having the mother knock and hold the son down, McCracken allows us to see the strong emotions that the son might not have known about his mother, but the mother is truly feeling. This is also highlighted more when the mother says, “What do you say about me, when I’m not around?” This small little scene adds so much to the story and makes it stronger.

I loved the character of Plazo. He is such an innocent and it shows through very well. McCracken does this by placing real life cruelty in front of her character and then steps back to watch how Plazo handles the situation. One example is the cashier. Her sarcasm and cruel remarks are completely overlooked by Plazo as he responds to her with truth and honesty. It is really beautiful to read and see that kind of innocence.

One area that confuses me a bit is how come the mother would discipline her son but say nothing to the cashier who is far more prejudiced than the son.

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