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Monthly Archive for October, 2012

Snapshot post-mortem

For us, when we were in the company of family, Roofer’s had become untellable. The point of view in Stephanie Vaughn’s “The Battle of Fallen Timbers” slips somewhat from the traditional, limited structure of a first person narrator to look at the family as a whole, and at the grandmother (on page 146, the narrator […]

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“Mid-Autumn”

“My little one, I was once very young.  I was sixteen and I was very beautiful and I met Bao when he was seventeen.  It was at the most wonderful time of year for lovers to meet, at the Mid-Autumn Festival.” Butler’s “Mid-Autumn” gives off a failed fairy tale vibe, with a dash of hope […]

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“Mid-Autumn”

There are a couple of things I’d like to say about this story. It is clearly a Butler story, because all of the pieces tie into each other at the end. Unlike many of the other Butler stories we’ve read, though, this one is sort of an anti fairy tale. After we learn that the […]

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“Kid MacArthur”

First-person stories are generally always written both from the point of view of a first-person narrator and are about the narrator. Stephanie Vaughn’s “Kid MacArthur” is told from the point of view of MacArthur’s sister as she stands in the shadow of his greatness throughout her childhood. Her father only had eyes for her brother […]

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McCracken’s story does not disappoint with her witty humor and tinge of sadness. I found it amazing that McCracken can take characters like the mother and Plazo and make them perfectly normal and slightly out of balance with the world. It is amazing because it feels or sounds real to the reader. One can truly […]

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“Mercedes Kane”

I turned that report she wrote for me in and got an F.  The note at the bottom said: “You know you weren’t supposed to get help.” McCracken’s “Mercedes Kane” brings us into the world of a dysfunctional, immature mother, and a compensating, direly effected daughter.  When we are brought into the story, we see […]

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The Urban Coop

I felt that what this story is about is much more explicitly discussed in the writing. It isn’t so much a case of what the narrator isn’t saying, as it has been in other pieces we’ve read. I don’t feel as though Bergman shies away from talking about her characters’ anxieties at all. Is she able […]

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The narrator of “The Urban Coop” story faces a similar predicament to that of the narrator in “Yesterday’s Whales” – she is with a man who is focused on his career and who is not interested in procreating, while she wants a child, as she comes to learn, desperately. So how does Bergman make this […]

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Robert Olen Butler’s “Love”

Robert Olen Butler’s “Love” begins with an abstract statement from the narrator and it is referred to throughout the story. We learn that the narrator was a spy for the American Air force and he “was once able to bring fire from heaven” down upon his wife’s lovers. Butler uses elements of a fairy tale […]

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“Love” Butler

    “Love” was the title of Butler’s story.  This was ironic, because the Vietnamese man in the story didn’t scare his wife’s pursuers away, because he loved her.  He did it to control her.  He was so insecure of himself, he needed to keep this beautiful wife by his side in order for him […]

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